Monday, 26 April 2010

Secret Garden

While walking Hermione today, we discovered a track that runs between the Parramatta River and some properties near Rivendell in Concord, Western Sydney. We had explored the track from the other direction when we visited Rivendell near the concord hospital but this was a couple of Km's to the East.
The path meandered along the river side for sometime . . .
until we came to a large lawn area and some introduced tree species, like this majestic pine shown above . . .
soon after we discovered a heavily planted cliff or embankment that looked at little strange . . .
there seemed to be paths leading into the embankment and we could see small caves in the undergrowth . . .
following one of these it snaked through archways and up small stone stairs towards the top . . .
finally through a brightly sunlight exit about 4 or 5 metres higher than where we began . . .
we found ourselves in a large flat grassed area with a grassed embankment and a grand stone staircase . . .
up the staircase ever further from the river bank . . .
at the top of the stairs was a working fountain, with demonic gargoyle like faces spitting water . . .

From the side you can see it leads to a large house that is actually the Dame Eadith Walker Convalescent Hospital (Yaralla) which was completed in 1864. That grotto complex we came up through apparently once had a large swimming pool at the bottom.

Saturday, 24 April 2010

Random Images

Some images I've just processed through my standard work flow or what is sometimes called the 'digital darkroom'. After I have imported my images into my catalogue tool, Adobe Lightroom 2, where I sort and pick images for post processing in Adobe Photoshop CS4. This is where I crop, clone and enhance colour if required and finally sharpen with the CS4 NIK plugin Sharpener Pro 3.
Nikon D300, Tokina 11-16 f2.8 @ ISO 200, 16mm f22, HDR, B&W conversion with NIK Silver Efex Pro Click on photo for larger image view
Nikon D300, Nikkor 35mm f2 @ ISO 200, 35mm f2, 1/640 sec
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Nikon D300, Nikkor 18-200mm f3.5-5.6 @ ISO 200, 18mm f16, 1/250 sec
Click on photo for larger image view

Nikon D300, Nikkor 105mm Macro f2.8 @ ISO 200, 105mm f3, 1/3200 sec
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Friday, 23 April 2010

What is your dog thinking?

Give me time to understand what you want of me.
Place your trust in me. It's crucial to my well being.
Be aware that however you treat me I'll never forget.
Talk to me sometimes.
Even if I don't understand your words, I do understand your voice.
If you feel like hitting me remember
I have teeth that could hurt you, but that I choose not to bite you.
You have your work, your entertainment, and your friends. I have only you.
Any separation from you will be painful for me.
My life is likely to last 10 to 15 years.
Take care of me when I get old.
And on that final difficult journey it will be easier for me if you are there.

Sunday, 18 April 2010

The Bendigo Easter Fair

The first Bendigo Easter Fair was held in 1871 and is used to raise money for charitable causes. The first fair was considered such a success that it has been held every year since, making Australia's longest continuous running festival. The Festival is held every Easter.
Nikon D300, Nikkor 18-200mm f3.5-5.6 @ ISO 200, 18mm f3.5, 1/6400 sec
Click on photo for larger image view
One tradition for this festival is the Bendigo Chinese Associations 'Awakening of the Dragon'. The ceremony is unique to Bendigo. A lot of noise is required with the explosion of of firecrackers to awaken Sun Loong who will slowly rouse himself from his year long slumber to walk in the Gala Parade.

Nikon D300, Nikkor 18-200mm f3.5-5.6 @ ISO 200, 32mm f4.0, 1/1000 sec
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A gripple wire joiner on a fence
Nikon D300, Nikkor 105mm Macro f2.8 @ ISO 200, 105mm f3, 1/2000 sec
Click on photo for larger image view
Opuntia robusta, or Wheel Cactus or Camuesa Prickly Pear
Nikon D300, Nikkor 105mm Macro f2.8 @ ISO 200, 105mm f16, 1/100 sec
Click on photo for larger image view

Nikon D300, Nikkor 105mm Macro f2.8 @ ISO 200, 105mm f8, 1/400 sec
Click on photo for larger image view

Saturday, 10 April 2010

Brett Ryan R.I.P.


My beloved brother Brett Andrew Ryan tragically took his own life in Perth Western Australia and was cremated at Karrakatta Cemetery WA and his ashes are now in the care of his mother in his home state of Victoria.

You feel a range of emotions when a tragedy like this strikes you and the ones you love and you all feel the searing pain of sudden separation. There is anger and the futile search to understand why Brett could not weather the despair. There are the questions of why, just why? We all feel bruised by this death and keep asking ourselves what we could have done to prevent it. “What could I have done? Why didn’t I see it?” No one knows. And nothing will bring him back. No one is responsible for Brett’s choice but Brett. Death by choice is not a denial of life, it is the cry of despair for more life. We know that Brett leaves much unfinished, unfulfilled, unsaid. There are still things I wanted to share with him, and I'm sure, he with us. The suffering does not end for those that cared for him, feelings of shock, betrayal, anger, sadness, that I'm sure in time will abate to compassion and forgiveness.

Please if you care donate to Beyondblue http://www.givenow.com.au/beyondblue

Beyondblue's mission is to provide a national focus and community leadership to increase the capacity of the broader Australian community to prevent depression and respond effectively. They aim to build a society that understands and responds to the personal and social impact of depression, works actively to prevent it, and improves the quality of life for everyone affected.